What’s the best smartphone to buy?

It’s not about how much you spent for you smartphone. Let’s get that out of the way. The price tag does not define your phone. Far from it.

It stands true, too, that the design shouldn’t be the first thing on your mind. It should be what you need from your phone.

I, personally, would love to tell you the best phone in the market is the Google Pixel XL.

Why? It has great camera, great performance, first to get software and security updates, overall balanced design, natively runs Google Assistant across vanilla apps, unlimited full resolution photo and video storage, and the smoothest, cleanest (consumer grade) Android interface ever.

The only reason you haven’t heard of the phone (in the Philippines) is that it’s not officially sold here. Those that do have their hands on the Pixel and the Pixel XL won’t have warranty coverage thanks to technicalities on the fine print. These are all beside the fact that it is crazy expensive to get.

For you then, dear reader, it’s fairly simple: Ask these questions:

1. What do I need in a phone?

Every single time a person discovers that I specialize in tech, the first question has always been: “What’s a good smartphone to get?” Bar none.

Which is the wrong question to ask.

I would always ask back in return: “What do you need a smartphone for?” Then they would stop and think. Often times they suddenly realize, they’ve been purchasing new phones for the wrong reason. Hence, ending up unhappy and discontent. Many fail to stop and consider the wealth of options before them.

After finally considering the question I would, more often times than not, get: “Good camera, ok performance, good battery.” Already expecting a brand and a unit, I fail them again and ask the secondary question which leads me to number 2.

2. How much is my budget?

While it would mean the world to be able to brag about having only the latest and greatest offering from your favorite brand, it doesn’t stand true that it is affordable for you.

Right after the first pause from the previous question, this is the secondary question a lot seem to neglect.

It is from this point that we can start trickling down on the options based on need and capacity to pay for said need.

Often times it all boils down to the most economical option after eliminating the choices after talking about the features and availability or advantages of the small price difference phone comparisons usually have. It’s funny to think how two simple questions separate you from spending an extra Php 20,000 because of want of bragging rights.

How do you pick your next smartphone?

Drew Uy

I do words, food, coffee, and photos. Hit me up on Twitter @ginuhit

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